Ouseburn walk – From a derelict place toward a creative quarter

1 06 2011

by: Ha mh Thai

The walk I took few weeks ago in order to search for a site for my dissertation thesis.

The area was home to the industrial revolution on the Tyneside in the late 18th century, and up until the 1960s it had a significant residential population, mainly workers from the industries nearby. At that time, it was a poor neighborhood surviving in very bad housing and health conditions. Thenceforth, the population greatly declined after the massive program of demolition and slum clearance. However, there are still plenty of warehouses, factories and seriously downgraded buildings, make the area looks like a neglected and derelict place.

Factory, warehouse and vacant block. Source: author, 2011.

Factory, warehouse and vacant block. Source: author, 2011.

Around the Ouseburn mouth and Lime Street, many regeneration projects bring a new look but still maintain the existing unique environment. The valley has become an attractive site for cultural industries and creative media businesses.

New site at Ouseburn mouth. Source: author, 2011.

New site at Ouseburn mouth. Source: author, 2011.


Ouseburn’s once derelict factories and warehouses are buzzing again as artists’ studios, music venues and cinemas.

A wide range of creative sites in Ouseburn: (from left) street arts, 36 Lime Street Warehouse Office and Studio, Ouseburn Farm. Source: author, 2011.

A wide range of creative sites in Ouseburn: (from left) street arts, 36 Lime Street Warehouse Office and Studio, Ouseburn Farm. Source: author, 2011.


Current project in operation: Maynards Toffee Factory view from Glasshouse Bridge, before and after regeneration. Source: Paul J White, available at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pauljw/4502542375/in/set-72157623681068575

Current project in operation: Maynards Toffee Factory view from Glasshouse Bridge, before and after regeneration. Source: Paul J White, available at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pauljw/4502542375/in/set-72157623681068575






Shoe Tree in Heaton

30 05 2011

Posted by Jun

About a year ago, when I went for a walk in Jesmond Dene, I bumped into this slightly mysterious scene of trees on which hundreds and hundreds of shoes were hung, in Armstrong Park. According to a web page, young people throw their shoes up to the branches celebrating the end of their exams whilst I imagined, secretly, a more melancholic story like out-grown feet of adolescence and their leaving old shoes.

Repetitive actions of anonymous individuals can be found elsewhere too. Piles of rock built one by one, by mountain climbers can be easily found in mountains in Korea. Some people say that it was a kind of ritual of asking mountain goblins not to disturb their journeys. Also, I saw a bicycle-tire tree in Hulme,Manchester, which was less attractive than the shoe tree.

By the way, the best part of this shoe tree is that there is an annual harvest(!) of shoes because the numbers of shoes need to be controlled in order to protect the trees.